gmail

Gmail now has an even simpler way to search for large attachments.  Enter the following text into the Gmail search bar:

To find emails with > 20MB in attachments:

larger:20m

To find emails with > 10MB in attachments:

larger:10m

If you have Gmail shortcuts enabled, select the emails you don’t need and hit SHIFT-3 to send them to the trash.

Drive storage 2013-11-11 21-58-30

helpme

In the process of building an API?  Looking to get started on your first API integration project?  This is a list of some of my favorite API documentation sites.

PubNub

Maintains one of the best examples of how to have a very complex system under the hood, while keeping a cool and organized API outline.  Oh, and the dev console is plain cool.

PubNub JavaScript SDK | JavaScript SDK 2013-11-06 22-39-07

Console 2013-11-06 22-40-53

Mandrill

Example JSON requests on each method page makes it easy for a developer to see the exact format their application should be communicating with the API.

mandrill

Stripe

Simple and logical method names like cards, customers, and coupons allow Stripe to build a dead-simple structure to house a robust API.

stripe

Context.io

Extremely well-organized, color coded, and built-in real test examples on each resource page.

Context.IO | The missing email API to leverage email data 2013-11-06 22-56-08

Searchify

Less is more.  Searchify keeps their documentation lean, and makes it very easy to understand.

searchify

Plivo

Inviting documentation that is easy on the eyes.  Fonts and other text emphasis makes it easy to hop around the documentation and find what you are looking for.

plivo

Have an example to add to the list?  Leave it in the comments.

windows-key

I recently started using a Macbook Air as my full time computer, so I needed to hook up a keyboard and mouse to it. Automatically, OSX assigns the “Windows” key on the keyboard to be the “Command” key in OSX, which will drive you insane.

After doing a lot of digging, I realized there is a very easy solution to this built right into the Keyboard settings section in OSX System Preferences.

system-preference_upload

1.  Go to System Preferences > Keyboard

keyboard-settings_upload

2.  Hit the “Modifier Keys” button

switch-settings_upload

3.  Select your USB keyboard from the drop-down menu (there should be two keyboards listed), make sure to not change the built-in keyboard settings.

4.  I found that turning my keyboard’s CTRL key to the Command key made it intuitive for me to CTRL-C and CTRL-V and perform the other command options.

5.  Since you do need to sometimes access the CTRL key in OSX, I made the function of the “Windows Key” (Command Key) on the external keyboard map to the CTRL key in OSX.

For reference, this is the “Windows” key on a PC keyboard:

windows-key

Hope this helps!

apple

 

  • Nintendo’s stock (PINK:NTDOY) is at a 10-year low, with a market cap now at only $13B (less than 10% of Apple’s available cash)
  • USD is at a 2-year high as compared to the Japanese Yen.
  • Nintendo lacks product innovation, but creates great games and characters.  Apple has no track record with successful games, but 300M+ people use Apple devices.
  • AppleTV has no game functionality built-in, and the graphical simplicity of Nintendo games would likely allow them to run on existing AppleTV hardware.  Wii Sports and other family games would be a perfect fit for the AppleTV.
  • Nintendo designs great controllers, and Apple knows that gaming on touch screens will always have limitation.  Imagine using a WiiMote with your Apple TV or iPhone?
  • Apple’s ability to exclusively sell Nintendo games to the ~300M+ active iOS devices would have huge potential, especially if Apple was absorbing 100% of the app sales instead of their usual 30%  royalty on game sales.

Disclosure: This should not be construed as financial advice in any way, shape or form.  I currently own a position in AAPL.

developer_api_icon

Edit 6/16/2013: It’s been a few months, and we finally ended up going with the Swagger-based documentation built into 3Scale.net.  Want to see how it looks?  Head over to developer.nutritionix.com.

— Begin original post —

As demand for our Nutritionix API is starting to grow rapidly, we have been working on finding an API documentation engine to meet our needs for the long-term.  I was not able to find any comprehensive list of existing API documentation solutions, so I am compiling what I have found so far. Please leave feedback on your own experience in the comments.

Web API Documentation Tools

We are still exploring each solution, but I will update this post as we learn more about each option.

  • Swagger - A specification and complete framework implementation for describing, producing, consuming, and visualizing RESTful web services. [Demo]
    • Note: We already use 3Scale.net for our API management solution, and they have an ActiveDocs feature based on Swagger.
  • I/O Docs - By defining APIs at the resource, method and parameter levels in a JSON schema, I/O Docs will generate a JavaScript client interface [Demo].  I/O docs was created by the API management platform Mashery.
  • apiary.io - Provides very quick way to get your documentation up and running, includes GitHub integration and I/O validation. – Suggested by Siyfion via Reddit.
  • Docco - Docco is a quick-and-dirty, hundred-line-long, literate-programming-style documentation generator. It produces HTML that displays your comments alongside your code.
  • Dexy - Flexible documentation tool that supports any language, for any API.
  • Doxygen - Generate an on-line documentation browser (in HTML) and/or an off-line reference manual, and you can configure doxygen to extract the code structure from undocumented source files.  Seems more technical than the other options, but a powerful option nonetheless.  Suggested by gkumar007 via Reddit.
  • TurnAPI – Paid service.  Intelligent WIKI-editor, markdown based standards, documentation branching, sync with Git, SVN, Mercurial, clean looking themes. [Features]
    • Note: As of writing I was unable to create an account at TurnAPI.

Edit 6/16/2013: It’s been a few months, and we finally ended up going with the Swagger-based documentation built into 3Scale.net.  Want to see how it looks?  Head over to developer.nutritionix.com